Question: What Is The Current CRR And SLR?

What is the difference between repo rate and bank rate?

Bank Rate and REPO rates are almost similar.

The central bank(RBI for India) lends money to a private bank for which the private bank needs to pay the interest rate.

The only difference is that the REPO rate is used to lend money for the short term while the bank rate for the long term..

What is the reverse repo rate?

Definition: Reverse repo rate is the rate at which the central bank of a country (Reserve Bank of India in case of India) borrows money from commercial banks within the country. It is a monetary policy instrument which can be used to control the money supply in the country.

Who decides repo rate?

As stated above, Repo Rate is set by the RBI for lending short term money to banks. Reverse Repo Rate is actually the opposite of Repo Rate. The RBI borrows money at this rate from the banks for the short term. In other words, the banks park their excess funds with the central bank at this rate, often, for one day.

Who keeps CRR?

The Reserve Bank of India takes stock of the CRR in every monetary policy review, which, at present, is conducted every six weeks. CRR is one of the major weapons in the RBI’s arsenal that allows it to maintain a desired level of inflation, control the money supply, and also liquidity in the economy.

Which banks maintain CRR and SLR?

The Central Bank controls the liquidity in the Banking system with CRR. In the case of SLR, the securities are kept with the banks themselves, which they need to maintain in the form of liquid assets. In CRR, the cash reserve is maintained by the banks with the Reserve Bank of India.

What is current SLR rate?

18.25%This percentage is fixed by the Reserve Bank of India. The maximum limit for the SLR was 40% in India. Following the amendment of the Banking regulation Act (1949) in January 2017, the floor rate of 20.75% for SLR was removed. As on 30 November 2019, the SLR is 18.25%.

What is current CRR rate?

4 per centCurrently, the CRR is 4 per cent, though the range of permissible CRR is between 3 and 15 per cent. If the CRR is four, this means that the banks will have to keep Rs 4 with the RBI whenever bank deposits increase by Rs 100. Higher the CRR, lower the amount of money banks can lend out or invest.

What is repo with example?

In a repo, one party sells an asset (usually fixed-income securities) to another party at one price and commits to repurchase the same or another part of the same asset from the second party at a different price at a future date or (in the case of an open repo) on demand.

How does the repo rate affect me?

A decrease in the repo rate means the commercial banks can borrow more money from SARB at a cheaper rate, meaning lending rates for consumers also decrease! … On the other hand, if interest rates increase, consumers will have less money to spend, causing the economy to slow and inflation to decrease.

What is the purpose of SLR?

1) One of the main objectives is to prevent commercial banks from liquidating their liquid assets when the RBI raises the CRR. 2) SLR is used by the RBI to control credit flow in the banks. 3) In a way, SLR also makes commercial banks invest in government securities.

Is RRB maintain CRR and SLR?

Other banks in India are directly regulated by RBI. … Regional Rural Banks Act, 1976. Statutory pre-emptions – RRBs need not maintain CRR (Cash Reserve Ratio) & SLR (Statutory liquidity ratio) like any other banks.

What is current CRR and SLR rate?

Reserve RatioCRR3%SLR18.00%